Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past Forum

Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past Forum

 

View the first forum, originally aired on August 26, 2021

The first Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past forum was a virtual program about racial inequities in wellness and wealth in the U.S. From race science to COVID-19, physical and mental health, and challenges to wealth building, we explored how we arrived where we are today and how we can imagine a new way forward together. The forum is captioned in English and Spanish. We hope you enjoy the program and join us for future forums and events.

Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past Forum Content & Speakers

Hosted by Sabrina Lynn Motley with special commentary from Akilah Hughes

Composite image of Lonnie G. Bunch III; Pilar Ossorio, Ph.D., J.D.; Damion Thomas, Ph.D.

Segment: What’s Real About Race?

From measuring head and nose sizes to determining intelligence in the pre-WWII era to "race-norming" in the NFL, race science has been the false proof of scientific differences by race. Race science was used to justify genocide, segregation, and persistent systemic inequity. Even though race is a social, not biological difference, the effects of race science continue today. 

A discussion with Lonnie G. Bunch III; Pilar Ossorio, Ph.D., J.D.; Damion Thomas, Ph.D.

Composite image of Juliet K. Choi, J.D.; Sean Sweat; and Louise Seamster, Ph.D.

Segment: Race, Health, and Wealth

Race, wealth, and health are intertwined. Struggles over health and economic justice have been part of the construction of race and racism since colonization. Movements for racial justice have always included consideration for collective wellness as well as economic freedom. An equitable shared future is one where people of all races can live well and prosper.

A discussion with Juliet K. Choi, J.D.; Sean Sweat; and Louise Seamster, Ph.D.

Two happy new homeowners

Mini Documentary: Latino Community Credit Union

National statistics show that when compared to white households, Latino households have limited access to bank accounts and reduced ability to build credit histories. Those facts make them vulnerable to predatory loans and excessive interest rates, or, for cash-based workers, targets for robberies and violence. It also excludes Latinos from the financial tools that lead to home ownership and entrepreneurship. This short documentary explores how the Latino Community Credit Union in North Carolina is changing the lives particularly of Latino and immigrant populations.

Composite image of Dr. Joi Lewis; Monique Morris, Ed.D.; Diana Chao; and Kyra Anton

Segment: Mental Health and Trauma

How do we reckon with the harsh realities of our racial past while also preserving the mental and emotional wellbeing of those who have been most impacted by racism? This conversation serves as an opportunity to explore this layered question and expand the understanding of mental and emotional health. Despite facing systemic barriers to wellness and wealth, communities of color find ways to resist and practice joy.

A discussion with Dr. Joi Lewis; Monique Morris, Ed.D.; Diana Chao; and Kyra Antone

Student at The Institute for Healing Justice and Equity at St. Louis University

Mini Documentary: Institute for Healing Justice and Equity at St. Louis University

In 2020, the deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd ignited shockwaves that became a visceral moment of racial reflection around the world. But for the community of Ferguson, Missouri and the surrounding neighborhoods, the fatal shooting of Mike Brown in 2014 has endured as a rallying call for racial justice. This short documentary explores The Institute for Healing Justice and Equity at St. Louis University, whose mission is to eliminate disparities in individual and community wellness.

Thank You!

We invite you to explore the contributions of our wonderful museum partners that helped shape Race and Our Shared Future's first forum.